Unit 3 Study Guide a guide to preparation for all parts of the Unit Exam The section Specific Tips is now visible.

Tips: What Helps Learning? from the FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

 

If you have questions about any of this webpage, please ask. I will expand these answers based on your questions.

Practical Issues That Students Frequently Want to Know

The two parts of the exam are:

All of the questions are done as sets:

Information that students frequently want to know about the two parts of the tests

Practical Issues about Content That Students Frequently Want To Know

Test questions will be from:

Information that students frequently want to know about writing an answer:

Specific Tips for Content in Chapters 11 and 12 and for Chapter 13 through 15

In Chapters 11 and 12:

In Chapters 13 through 15:

 

Practical Issues That Students Frequently Want to Know

The two parts of the exam are:

         The objective part means methods that are machine gradable, such as multiple choice, true/false, ordering items, and matching items.

         The written part means a good, competent factual explanation of something in the history covered from Chapter 11 to Chapter 15. For this exam only, the questions will all relate to the Constitution, to events that led to its provisions, or to events that filled in or completed its provisions

All of the questions are done as sets:

         The objective part consists of 25 questions at 4 points each--but, for each question, fate could ask you any 1 of 4 or more questions.
In other words, there are a minimum of 100 questions in the test.

         The written part is 1 question worth 40 points (20 for its content and 20 for whether you follow the 5 Good Habits for Evidence)but there are multiple versions (3 only for this test) of the written test that I hand out.

Information that students frequently want to know about the two parts of the tests

         You have one hour for the two parts of the test.

         The questions are meant to be ones that are useful understanding about history. They will not be trick questions.

 

Practical Issues about Content That Students Frequently Want To Know

Test questions will be from:

         The textbook

         InQuizitive but not in the exact words of the InQuizitive questions

         The required primary sources
Tip: The links used in class and available in Figuring It Out (Learning is More Than Memorizing) frequently cover facts worth being on the Objective part of the exam.

 

Caution: Please read and ask if you dont understand.

Information that students frequently want to know about writing an answer:

For this exam, you will have a choice. A link below this one covers this.

 

Specific Tips for Content in Chapters 11 and 12 and for Chapter 13 through 15

Caution: For all chapters, you must read the primaries.

In Chapters 11 and 12:

8 Things (With Examples) that You Want to Notice in Chapters 11 and 12

In Chapters 13 through 15:

The facts on this link provided with Chapter 13s Figuring It Out (Learning is More Than Memorizing) are probable on the test:

Study Tool for 1832-1861: Events and Trends That Lead to the War

 

The facts on this link provided with Chapter 14 and Chapter 15s Figuring It Out (Learning is More Than Memorizing) are probable on the test and the written questions (shown to those in class) reveal which facts are probable on both the written and objective test.

1860-1877 Quick Reference to the Civil War and to Reconstruction

 

Tip: there are few battles in the Civil War covered on the test. They are listed on this link.

 

Copyright C. J. Bibus, Ed.D. 2003-2015

 

WCJC Department:

History Dr. Bibus

Contact Information:

281.239.1577 or bibusc@wcjc.edu

Last Updated:

2015

WCJC Home:

http://www.wcjc.edu/