What’s a Rubric?

A rubric is a tool to help instructors grade consistently and to help students understand the reasons for their grades so they can improve. In Blackboard (and other tools), rubrics can calculate scores based on where the instructor clicks within the rubric they built.

 

Rubrics vary, but, in Blackboard, rubrics are in a table (a visual with columns, rows, and cells) like the one visible if you scroll down to the bottom of this page:

·         The columns of the rubric are the levels of work, ranging from the lowest on the left to the highest on the right (For the rubric for this course, the levels of work range from left to right from an F” Paper to an A” Paper.)

·         The rows of the rubric are the requirements being measured (For the rubric for this course, the first requirement is Reading FOR Evidence and each box, or cell, in the row shows specific for reading for each grade level. There are 3 other requirements being measured in each of the rows below the first one.)

·         The cells of the rubric are what the instructor clicks (in the actual rubric in Blackboard) to record a grade and to give you feedback on the problem or virtue in your work.

 

Some rubrics (such as the one below) and some tools (such as Blackboard) can automatically calculate a weighted score. For example, Reading FOR Evidence is the major requirement for Comparisons and is worth 60% of the total grade. For example, if your comparison is worth 20 points, 60% of 20 is 12 and if I click on the cell at the intersection of the column for an F” Paper Critieria and the row for Reading FOR Evidence, Blackboard lets the instructor choose from 0 points to 7.18 (.594 X 12an F being worth a maximum of 59.4% and  X 12 for Reading FOR Evidence

And the row

The cell at the intersection of Reading

What Are the Parts of the Rubric and How Does It Determine Your Grade

1.       Notice the column Requirement and that the greatest value is to Reading for Evidence (60%), Writing With Evidence (30%) and the other two only account for 5% each.

2.       Notice the rows for each requirement with each letter grade have a different set of traits in the cell. For example, the cell for Reading FOR Evidence

·         Under the F” Paper begins with the words Assumed. Used an unreliable source or….

·         Under the D” Paper begins with the words Misread, read passively, or….

 

3.       Notice the other 3 columns, one for each of the traditional letter grades. With the C” Paper, B” Paper, or A” Paper, all of the cells are not about problems with the Good Habits for Evidence, but the cells cover the traits of a good paper from a C, to a B, to an A.

4.       Although it is not written in these columns because Blackboard calculates the values for each cell in a column, those columns use the traditional percentages of 90% for for an A, 80% for a B, 70% for a C, and 60% for a D, and less than 60% is an F.

Fortunately for you and me, Blackboard will calculate the math based on which cell I click for each row, but it usually helps to see this explanation.

 

To give an example of a 10-point writing assignment because that is easiest to calculate:

 

5.1      For Reading FOR Evidence. Reading is worth 60% of the 10—or 6. If you made a mid-B on Reading, that’s 85% (.85 X 6 =5.1)

2.1      For Writing WITH Evidence. Writing is worth 30% of the 10—or 3. If you made a low C, that’s 70% (.70 X 3 =2.1)

0.425 For Following Directions for Evidence. Directions are 5% of the 10 —or .5. If you made a mid-B, that’s 85% (.85 X .5 = .425)

0.35   For Mechanics are 5% of the 10 —or .5. If you made a low C, that’s 70% (.70 X .5 = .35)

7.975 <Your grade out of 10 possible points                                             ^ If you add up the values in bold above, 6 + 3 + .5 + .5 = 10.

 

5.       If you have no marks in the column for the F” Paper and the D” Paper, that means you followed the Good Habits for Evidence with this writing assignment. That also means that you will get the full points for the separate Good Habits for Evidence grade. That grade increases in value with the assignments to encourage you practice those Good Habits for Evidence consistently.

6.       If you have questions about this rubric, please ask.

 

Requirement

F Paper

D Paper

C Paper

B Paper

A Paper

Reading FOR Evidence (60%)

Assumed. Used an unreliable source or an incorrect or incomplete part of the source required for the question asked.

Misread, read passively, or made errors such as cherry-picking facts or embellishing facts.

Accurately read the parts, but did not try to evaluate or to synthesize the interconnections.

Accurately read the parts and analyzed each one. Tried to evaluate and synthesize interconnections.

Accurately read the parts and analyzed each one. Evaluated and synthesized the interconnections.

Writing WITH Evidence (30%)

Wrote assumptions. Used " inaccurately and changed meaning. Did not answer all parts of the question.

Wrote passively. Plagiarized or did “half-copy” plagiarism (also called “patchwrite”). Used “inaccurately, including making the author's sentences look grammatically incorrect.

Only summarized separately each of the parts of the question, but did not cover interconnections.

Revealed each part and covered some interconnections. Provided few examples.

Understood each part and revealed the parts’ interconnections. Provided clear and representative examples.

Following Directions FOR Evidence

(5%)

Did not follow directions above or with the questions (such as maximum length).

Did not follow directions.

Followed the directions. 

Followed the directions carefully.

Followed the directions exactly.

Mechanics - Using Language and Punctuation Accurately (5%)

Many mechanical errors.

Several mechanical errors.

Two or more mechanical errors.

One or more mechanical errors.

No more than one minor mechanical error.

 

 

 

 

WCJC Department:

History – Dr. Bibus

Contact Information:

281.239.1577 or bibusc@wcjc.edu

Last Updated:

2014

WCJC Home:

http://www.wcjc.edu/